To change the

Story

We have to change the

We have to change the

StoryTeller

Our approach to
diversity & representation

Senior reporter Linda Mujuru (Zimbabwe) has powerful access to local sources, like this young miner, Oliz Matope.

Did you know that representative newsrooms can foster global narrative change?

Video FAQ: Why don't you have bureaus in the United States?

The Problem

There is an evidence-based correlation between who works in a newsroom and who is quoted in stories. That means that a lack of diversity in newsrooms contributes to the lack of holistic and equitable storytelling about the world.

Our Solution

At Global Press, our hiring model intentionally eliminates specific barriers to entry, from race and gender to socioeconomic status, inviting teams of representative journalists into positions of prominence, covering their communities for Global Press Journal's local and international audiences.

Two thirds of all international news is reported by men.

In every country on earth, women are underrepresented in the field of journalism. And when women do work in journalism, they typically receive less pay than their male counterparts and are often limited to writing about lifestyle or fashion.

These factors contribute to the dearth of women featured and quoted in stories, resulting in news stories that do not accurately represent experts and newsmakers in global communities. Did you know that just 24% of all news sources are women? 

At Global Press, we intentionally hire local, women journalists.

Here, their stories of business, health, economics, migration and innovation feature diverse and representative sources. Our reporters earn strong salaries and enjoy a full suite of employment benefits, ensuring their ability to thrive in the profession.

Beyond gender, these ten barriers to entry contribute to a lack of diverse voices in journalism.

In each bureau location, Global Press designs a unique hiring strategy to ensure we're eliminating these common barriers to entry into the field of journalism. Global Press builds representative newsrooms that produce inclusive stories that reflect the diversity of each community.

Location

Generation

Education

Disability

Ancestry

SocioEconomic

Sexuality

Religion

Political Affiliation

Language

representation strategy

Zimbabwe

Next: Haiti
Geography

In Zimbabwe, nearly all media outlets are centered in the country’s two largest cities, Harare and Bulawayo. Both journalism jobs and news coverage are scarce in other parts of the country.

Ancestry

Most journalists in Zimbabwe speak English or Shona, a language spoken by the Shona people, who make up a majority of Zimbabwe’s population. News in Ndebele, the language spoken by a minority group with a history of political persecution in Zimbabwe, is not widely available.

Political Affiliation

The majority of media outlets in Zimbabwe are state owned or politically affiliated. Hiring is conducted along political lines.

How it works

We're removing barriers to entry in the Zimbabwean media market by recruiting reporters across geography, ancestry and political affiliations. Diverse reporters create more representative news coverage.

representation strategy

Haiti

Next: Haiti
Language

Most Haitian people speak Creole. However,  French is widely used for official matters despite the fact that must of the country does not speak or read French. Most news is published in French, making both journalism jobs and news coverage scarce in Creole.

Education

Haitian education is uneven in urban and rural areas, making journalism jobs and media coverage scarce outside of the capital. Educational inequities reinforce the preference for French speakers in all journalism jobs.

Socioeconomic Status

The majority of Haitian people live below the poverty line, while most media outlets are controlled by the country’s business and political elite. Nepotism among the similarly elite is a common practice in hiring for reporters and editors.

How it works

We're removing barriers to entry in the Haitian media market by recruiting reporters across language, education and socioeconomic statuses. Diverse reporters create more representative news coverage.

representation strategy

Mongolia

Next: Haiti
Geography

More than 95% of the country's media outlets are based in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia's capital city. Both media coverage and journalism jobs are scarce throughout the rest of the country.

Sexuality

Members of the LGBTQ community are under-represented in Mongolian newsrooms. Mongolia is one of the few Global Press countries where it is safe to openly recruit LGBTQ journalists.

Political Affiliation

Just one in ten Mongolian media outlets is transparent about its ownership, according to the Mongolia Media Ownership Monitor. Reporters are hired and stories are covered along political lines in the majority of the country's news outlets.

How it works

We're removing barriers to entry in the Mongolian media market by recruiting reporters across geography, sexuality and political affiliation. Diverse reporters create more representative news coverage.

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